Finally some buds…

Paeonia (unknown cultivar)

Paeonia (unknown cultivar)

After five long years my pass-a-long Peony from the neighbor is budding up for the first time.  I moved it this past fall from a shady location to one that gets mostly sun.  Looks like the transplant was a success because it has produced two decent size flower buds and one small one.  From the looks of it the color appears to be a deep red or pink tone.  She didn’t know the cultivar’s name and I can’t remember if she said it was scented or not.  The important thing is it is pretty happy situated next to the Clematis ‘Nelly Moser’ on the new trellis and a unnamed rose that also happens to be this shade of reddish pink.  I just love Peonies, they are definitely in my top 10 favorite spring blooming perennials.  Even after the blooms have long faded, the foliage usually remains nice and green right up the first hard frost.     Here’s some interesting information I found online about this herbaceous perennial:

  • Only genus in the flowering plant family of Paeonieceae
  • In the past they were classified in the same family as Hellebores & Anemones
  • Named after Paeon, a student of Asclepius (the Greek God of Healing & Medicine)
  • Zeus saved Paeon from his jealous master by turning him into a Peony flower
  • A traditional floral symbol of China along with the Plum blossom
  • It’s the state flower of Indiana replacing the Zinnia in 1957
  • They attract ants because of the nectar on the outside of their buds
  • Longest used flower in ornamental culture
  • Native to Asia, southern Europe and Western North America
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17 responses to this post.

  1. It is interesting to see the effect of finding the right spot for a plant…Now you can enjoy some new Peony blooms this year!

    Yes it is Chris, looks like all my hardwork last fall moving things around is paying off this spring. 🙂

    Reply

  2. Hooray! I love peonies too. I’m glad you’re getting some buds, five years is a long time to wait!

    Thanks Kathleen! 🙂 They really are one of my favorite spring blooms, the flowers are so gorgeous. Looks like my waiting is finally paying off this year.

    Reply

  3. YIPPIE!!!! Cangratts to you!!!!
    I love Paeonias. They are one of my favorit plants!
    This year I have 19 potts to plant with different paeoniaplants!
    Linda

    Thanks Linda, it is pretty exciting! They are one of my faves too. 🙂 Wow, you have a huge collection of them compared to my 3 plants. 🙂

    Reply

  4. Hi Racquel..Five long years! It’ll be worth it though as peonies are lovely! And the trick is not to plant them too deep, too. My peonies are only a foot high (still in the red shoots stage) so I’m excited for your buds 🙂

    Yep five long years, it was a small division and that’s probably why it took so long (other than the lack of sunshine. 🙂 I learned that lesson the hard way (planting too deep) with my first one 10 years ago. 😉 Thanks Lynn, isn’t it weird how things that are coming into bloom in my garden are just emerging in yours?

    Reply

  5. I love all the peonies. So happy you have some buds. Next year you’ll have triple the number. Can’t wait to see it open-ah and to smell it.

    Thanks Tina. It shouldn’t be much longer and I will be having blooms on all three of my plants. Looks the bloom time might be a bit staggered which is good. 🙂

    Reply

  6. Five years!!! You must have the patience of a Saint! LOL

    I wouldn’t say that Randy, lol! It was a small division my neighbor shared with me, so that’s why it took so long I’m thinking. 🙂

    Reply

  7. Racquel I planted my first peony last Spring and I am looking forward to “a” bud ? or maybe more if I am lucky .. yours looks great girl !

    You should be fine Joy, the nursery stock ones are usually mature enough to bloom the first season. Every season the amount of buds double & sometimes triple. That’s something to look forward to, huh? 🙂

    Reply

  8. I have never grown these and don’t know if I could. Can’t wait for you to show the bloom. It is nice when we find a good forever home for our plants.

    I’m not sure Darla, they prefer cooler temps in the winter I know to help them set buds. You might want to check your local nurseries to see if they sell them in your area. I promise to share my blooms with all of you. 🙂

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  9. I had to laugh at your title. For my peonies I’ve been thinking, finally they’ve started coming up from the ground. I was afraid they might be dead, but then I think that every years.

    lol, it is remarkable to watch things emerge each year that you are sure didn’t make it. I had some losses this year, but very minimal. That late spring snow was a shocker to the garden I think. 😉

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  10. I have been trying for 12 years to get Peonies to pop up – this year they finally look decent. My Grandmother had glorious Peonies – lush and a long strip of them in every hue – they grew with neglect like every other flower she had. I’ve tried that ( she was a fiesty 4′ 11″ woman)- I think it’s finally working. Love your site. Jennifer

    Some things thrive on neglect. Two of mine have been doing well for the 10 years they’ve been in the garden. Last fall I finally fertilized them after 5 years of nothing, lol. Plus I added a nice 2″ layer of compost to the beds. They are happy campers this spring. Thanks for stopping by Jennifer, glad to meet you! 😉

    Reply

  11. Divided peonies do take a long time to bloom, though I think mine only took three years! The blooms get bigger and more plentiful every year, too. Yay!

    I think it was a combination of being transplanted, a small division with maybe only 1 eye and not enough sunlight. Yay for even more blooms next year Monica! 😉

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  12. One day I’ll add a peony to the garden. My grandmother-in-law was going to give me some of hers but we haven’t been there at the right time of the year.

    You won’t regret adding this beautiful spring bloomer to your garden Dave. Hope your grandmother-in-law shares some of hers this fall with you. 🙂

    Reply

  13. It’s too bad they don’t perform well here. They are certainly gorgeous! I had a customer tell me yesterday they don’t like being moved. Maybe that’s why it took so long to bloom.

    Really? I know some aren’t scented. They are really glorious blooms! Yep they don’t transplant well with the taproot, but this division was really small so that was probably part of the issue too. 🙂

    Reply

  14. Mother’s peonies are blooming too. I can’t wait to see them tomorrow. She has promised me a bouquet to bring home! Yea!
    Have a great weekend Racquel!

    Lucky you to get a gorgeous bouquet of these spring beauties! Have a nice weekend Linda! 🙂

    Reply

  15. Lucky you! Peonies are a treasure! They like manure tea too….

    Thanks DP, they really are a treasure aren’t they! Thanks for the great tip, I did give them a nice layer of compost last fall and they are happy. 🙂

    Reply

  16. Posted by Chandramouli.S on April 25, 2009 at 2:50 am

    That was quite long, Racquel, but I’m sure they’re worth waiting for. Love their foliage too – a lush green. Have a great weekend, Racquel.

    It was Chandramouli but worth the wait for these sweet smelling spring blooms! They do have nice green foliage that remains long after the blooms have faded, right up till frost actually. 🙂 Have a nice weekend in the garden!

    Reply

  17. I have lots of buds on mine now too! Can’t wait for them to open.

    Yay for Peonies! 🙂

    Reply

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